Wednesday, March 23, 2016

An Incredible Privilege... Talking Training with Norway's Head XC Ski Coach

During the Tour Canada XC ski world cup, myself and Ian Murray received a great privilege...talking training with Norwegian head ski coach Trond Nystad. It’s no doubt that the Norge’s rule the xc ski world. In race after race in the 4 day skiing extravaganza podium after podium was dominated by the Norwegian red and blue colors. At the end of the Canmore leg of the tour, the overall xc world cup season globes were awarded and in almost every category it was almost always a Norwegian sweep. So when the head coach speaks... you listen, carefully.

Did Trond reveal their secrets? Absolutely. And it wasn’t merely because he thought these two hapless sport chaplains were no threat, indeed, Trond stated he would freely share with anyone the secret to ski success.

So, as you sit on your seat with incredible anticipation, you’re begging for me to reveal the Norwegian secret to success. Here it is...

“Hard work’

Well duh, you’re thinking. That’s obvious. Be more specific. Trond, in a general sense summed things up in that statement. He must have repeated it a dozen times. “Hard work’. So what does that look like?

For the Norwegians it means 1000 hour training years. Some of his guys (and these numbers are for gals too) go up to 1250 hours. But that 1000 hours was the gold standard. Of course they can’t just be empty training hours with no specificity, strength and intensity, etc.  But in a basic sense there needs to be a lot of volume. What about intensity? That’s what we asked too. No surprise here, just the same basic training method we’ve been using for years and years...2 intensities per week. He said sometimes at certain times per year they go 3, but for the most part 2 intensities per week.

Years ago I sat down with NMU xc ski coach Sten Fjeldheim and he taught me how to train the Norwegian way. Actually it’s just the basic way. A few years later I read the book, “Serious Training for Endurance Athletes”. What Sten taught me was pretty much all in the book. Basic concepts like periodization, yearly phases of training, training zones, yearly emphasis, etc.  If you’re new to training and don’t recognize those terms, get the book. You’ll have the foundation and a knowledge pretty much on par with what Trond does with his athletes, the best in the world.

Even the Norwegians themselves have toyed with straying from this simple formula through the years, and have done so to their detriment. A dozen years ago I know they were doing things like “super intensity blocks” and other such extreme training, but their results really slipped. So, they’ve learnt their lesson the hard way, don’t mess with success! (Or stray from the tried and true methods of winning races).

Funny how athletes and coaches are always looking for the magic bullet that will propel them to success.  Or some coaches want to be the go to guy with the “know all” guru secret, but the message here ain’t rocket science, just get to work, put those hours in and see where it’ll get ya.  Now go do it!

1 comment:

Biath.Al.On said...

Sure, it takes hard work to become great, but it is much easier if you have culture, tradition, $$ and a nice big, fat gene pool on your side.